The great flood of 1955 washed through the Broadhead Creek separating Stroudsburg from East ‘burg. Lots of people died. Lots of property got destroyed. Lots of volunteers rallied to help each other through the morass.

Growing up in the ‘burgs during the ensuing decades, flood stories got passed down from generation to generation. The bridge between the towns got replaced, and levees got built on both sides to protect the “flats” as properties lining the creek are still called.

The flood shaped the personalities of the townsfolk for decades. People watched out for each other, and for their kids. But as the witnesses to the tragedy eventually died off, and the area became a New York City commuter town, those close-knit memories and lessons faded away.

Today, it’s hard to imagine the devastation caused by the great flood of 1955. Especially since COVID hit the area so hard early in the pandemic.

Ralph Bender here for Enduring Wealth Advisors®. Like, comment or share if you enjoy hearing from us.

Personal experiences, and the lessons we learn from role models based on their experiences, play a big part in shaping our behaviors.

Depression-era babies and millennials share in experiencing a global financial crisis early in life, followed by world war, albeit military for the greatest generation versus the Coronavirus of their grandchildren.

The space race, nuclear arms race and racial turmoil shaped the boomers, while Y2K and 9/11 set the tone for their kids.

Experiences create what psychologists call unconscious biases. And biases, by definition, lead to missed opportunities and unforeseen threats.

At Enduring Wealth Advisors, we work hard to get beyond preconceived notions, look for true opportunities, and remain vigilant about systemic risks.

Schedule a call with an advisor at enduringwealth.com today, to see how your biases might be misshaping your decisions.

Gotta run!